Tag Archive | save the arts

Arts Under Attack

Last month I highlighted the recent changes in the prison service which were resulting in prison arts coming under threat. Electric guitars and acoustic guitars with metal strings have already been removed from the national list of permitted items, paints and other arts and hobbies supplies are near impossible to obtain in many prisons, a startling number of prisoners have had their creative writing taken or withheld by prison staff for undefined ‘security reasons’, and drama courses are now virtually unheard of in most prisons.

Since writing this post I have spoken to a number of other prisoners here at Wakefield who have been affected by this and, after some discussion, we all agreed that something had to be done. Unfortunately, when prisoners organise a petition or other collective action inside prisons we are often placed on report for ‘incitement’. However, the same does not apply on the outside. For that reason I have now set up an online petition aiming to convince the Ministry of Justice to reconsider their approach to prison arts. And that’s where I need your help. Prisoners cannot sign it. I can’t even sign it myself. But you can. So please, think of all of those who rely on prison arts just to cope with being in jail. Think of those who spend all of their time and money on creating something positive only to have it stamped on. Sign the petition. You can make a real difference to hundreds, even thousands of lives.

The petition can be found at https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/save-prison-arts Continue reading

Save the Arts!

Life without industry is guilt, and industry without art is brutality.”

From ‘The Relation of Art to Morals’

by John Ruskin

The Ministry of Justice under Chris Grayling recently published a new Prison Service Instruction detailing a number of changes to the prison system. Many of these changes are designed to encourage prisoners to engage in what they call ‘purposeful activity’ and ‘rehabilitation’. The aim of this is to enable changes in attitudes by requiring prisoners to work for privileges. On one level it is an admirable effort reminiscent of the above quote by John Ruskin. Life without industry is guilt, it’s true. Work purifies the soul. But this very same instruction has other effects too.

This instruction lists all of the items which prisoners are permitted to hold in their possession and, removed from this list, are electric guitars and any acoustic guitars which have metal strings (which are the vast majority). Furthermore, it has become impossible in many jails for prisoners to buy paints and, at HMP Wakefield, prisoners have even had their creative writing taken from them by the security department without any reason being given.

Life without industry is guilt. But industry without art is brutality. Continue reading